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constructive. there are a few federal reserve blogs. the atlanta fed has one. the new york fed has one. we have twitter and facebook. we are moving along here. so, we are still a little bit old-fashioned. i think the social media does provide a convenient way to communicate the way -- communicate quickly and strange ideas. -- exchange ideas. some positive developments there. >> we should encourage you to follow the tigers. unfortunately, we are out of time. i would like to thank our questioners for posing the questions. i would like to thank all of you in the room and online for joining us in today's conversation. you can find information at the ford school on our website. i hope you'll follow us. >> several live events this morning. the council for science and the environment discusses disasters in the environment. the discussion will focus on the lessons of hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought, and the earthquake in japan. that is on c-span3 at 8:30 on with -- , today's a few moments headlines and phone calls, live on washington journal. the us house of representatives will be in session at
localize it in many other places. they could do in atlanta and miami. those of you who read the i.h.. the know sometimes it is localized. so "the times" is trying to survive and there are many ways it might survive. they issue of course extremely optimistic financial reports it will get better and it will get better. around that leads me to my final sentence which is to quote lord northcliffe who owned "the london times" and "the daily mail". and he said "somewhere someone is trying to suppress the real story, the rest is advertising"" and what i tried to do in my book was separate the real story from advertising. thank you. [applause] >> we are going to have a q&a and the c-span person is going to walk around with that instead of me and he wants to catch you, so don't start talking until he gets there. so if you want to be on c-span, raise your hand. would anybody like to ask me a question or talk about something? oh, come on. does anyone want to say something? >> go ahead. >> i've read that i guess maybe it's common knowledge that when rupert murdoch purchased the "wall street j
of days, now can go back to california? >> chad is with us from atlanta. republican line. >> thank you for taking my call. i was wondering, what are some of the challenges that president obama may face in his second term? you saw the battles and went on with the debt, the fiscal cliff. i know that they pushed back the debt ceiling for about three months, i believe. i was wondering if there was any chance for congress and the president to foster more bipartisanship during the second term? >> i think that will be a major theme of his speech tomorrow. i think he will be speaking out, once again, across the aisle to call for the reaching of common ground on these major issues, like the debt ceiling, the budget, gun-control, immigration, tax reform, those kinds of things. i think it is true that we have a divided government now. it has been a difficult four years, but president obama is a natural conciliate her -- conciliation person, and he will make that a big theme of his second term. i think you will hear some of that tomorrow. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can d
for people attending the inaugural. curtis from atlanta, a democrat. caller: good morning. thank you for the coverage on c- span. it was not too long ago that i woke up, and i'm enjoying what i have heard and seen on television. i just wanted to say -- is a great day for america, and we as people in america, regardless of who we are, need to back up our president, and let's support him, because we are human being s and we lived in this country. let's come together as one, because we all need each other whether we know it or not. thank you, and had a great day. host: it was in 1853, franklin pierce's the inaugural. he recited his address from memory, 3329 words. of course, the longest inaugural address in history was william henry harrison in 1841. 8445 words. it was cold and rainy day. mr. harrison died a month after -- after delivering that inaugural address outside. george washington's second inaugural address was 135 words, the shortest in history. adam is in minneapolis. you are on c-span watcher in the inaugural coverage. caller: thank you for having me. i am in the green party
in washington. the hartford courant -- in atlanta georgia, independent, what are your thoughts, theron? caller: i am libertarian in atlanta. i was struck by two things from the speech. one of them was something he said and if another was something he did not say. he made a point about climate change and his concern for future generations. i was struck by the contradiction in that he does not appear to have much concern about the future generations when it comes to the debt that this country is forcing upon them. regarding what he did not say if there was no mention in his litany of things he wants to do on his leftist agenda regarding tax reform, which is something republicans and democrats i don't think want to see happen, because it is the core of the chronic capitalism that basically finances both of the political parties and something that would be a good thing for america if we were to get rid of the irs and income tax and repeal the 16th amendment? and go to a fair tax like libertarian gary johnson promoted in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic c
, republican. caller: i believe our public schools are failing us as a nation. i live in atlanta. many of our public schools in atlanta have been questioned or lost their accreditation because they are not meeting standards currently. our public schools are failing us as a nation. that is evidenced by many of your callers who don't have a very firm grasp of the english language. host: do you think the closing of a school that's not performing to a federally set standard is a fair move? caller: fair in an unachievable goal. i was told my entire life by my parents that life is not fair. life is not fair. host: glencore go on to brandon in dover, delaware, on our independent line. caller: how are you? nice show as usual. in delaware in my area we are having no problem with school closings. they are building more schools and bigger high schools and things of that nature. so we're having no problem here. do awaythink you should with the public schools. i have seen it being a problem because i used to travel a long way to school and i used to see houses out in the country. i used to think, sooner o
you think of all this? he said it is wonderful. host: chad joining us from atlanta. caller: thank you for taking my call this morning. i was wondering what were some of the challenges that president obama might face in the second term? as you saw the battle with the fiscal cliff and i know it pushed back the debt ceiling crisis for about three months, i believe. i was wondering if there would be a chance for congress and the president to be able to foster more bipartisanship during the second term than the first. guest: i think that's going to be a major theme of his speech. i think he will reach out, once again across the aisle to call for the reaching of common ground on some of these major issues like the debt ceiling, the budget, gun control, immigration, tax reform, those kinds of things. so i think that it is true that we are -- we have a divided government now. it has been a difficult four years but i think president obama is a natural. i think he will make that a big theme of his second term. i think you will hear some of that tomorrow. host: this is from this morning's "the w
the military code of justice is only one of those tools. and in the cases that we are looking atlanta lackland we have cases where as a commander looked at all of the evidence that was available to him or her decided that a court marshall was not the appropriate venue to get to the right answer in terms of justice in that case, so they used some of the other tools that are available to them. uniquely in the military justice system. i think it's not as well understood often times in terms of the decision that is commanders make in terms of the venue that is used to achieve the right outcome in a case. and the fact that we can use non-judicial punishment and in other forms that would have the same sanction as you would find in a court marshall but are done in a way that does not require the same level of standards of proof that a court marshall would is a very important tool that commanders can use in order to enforce discipline and get to a better outcome in more cases than if they did not have that tool. i think that's very important. >> i appreciate that. i think we are going to run and vote
is the countries oldest and largest gay-rights organization. offices in chicago, dallas, and atlanta, and we litigate around the country and to public education on lgbt and hiv-r elated rights issues. host: republican line. gloria, good morning. caller: good morning, gentlemen. thank you for taking my call to my family is six generations and the great state of california, and we have seen many changes take place, especially with regard to the issues that are on your program today. i am sure you probably know that in the 1950's, the greektown of san diego -- not san diego, san francisco, passed the ordinance to protect homosexuals from being attacked. you would go to jail if you beat someone out or when after someone and cause them harm because of their sexual preference. but we've also seen in the great state of california this issue turned into a mainly a white, very well established, male- dominated issue. the men who are gay in this state are not pork, they are not an agitated, and they -- not poor, not uneducated, and they are long on opportunity. i think the issue of not allowing peopl
an atlanta and the ability to have more than 10 rounds, but to have somebody like you, chief johnson, meet them when they come to the door. that is the best way to do it. my good friend joe biden, who i have spirited conversations about a lot of things, was talking to somebody in california who mentioned the fact, what if there is an earthquake out here and there is a lawless situation? in 1992, you have the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the store was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not heard anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me and on reasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-
evangelicals are calling for changes to the immigration laws. atlanta, georgia rep, in open phones. caller: i was thing he about the debt limit and the discussion about it. over the next four years, the only thing i would like to see is to set a standard on what the debt limit increase should be. 1% every four months, six months? said the increase because it's just going to keep rising and then there will be a discussion on the cuts. but you have a party in power for one term, four years or whatever, and then the next party comes in. all of this gridlock is creating uncertainty in the market and anxiety or people who receive social security benefits and the things like that. the last comment, i would love to see changes in elections due to corruption. that is how i would change in how this country is being run. host: democratic caller from pennsylvania. caller: i'm glad people are getting together. this is the age of the internet. if we did our reenact glass- steagall, we will not have anything. 1989, at the end of the cold war we owed $4 trillion. russia is not a debtor nation. they just sig
based in atlanta is the main agency of the federal government and in the world who doesn't disease tracking. they have capabilities of determining the relative percentage of visits and different types of clinics throughout the country that are related to what we call influenza-like influence -- and this is. they do testing among them to determine if it is influenza or another type of respiratory infection. what they have shown from the very beginning all of all of this is that we're having an upsurge in the number of percentages of visits that are related to influenza-like illness, and when you examine that, they successfully identified what kind of influence that it is, and they know really what this strain is. that is important. one of the things in this massive relatively sobering news is the good news is the influences strain circulating throughout society in the united states are very well matched to the vaccine that has been distributed, and that is a very powerful all demand for getting vaccinated against it, even though we are into january, it is not too late to get vaccina
. we're talking with steve clemons with "the atlanta." and gary schmitt of the american enterprise institute. our focus is the nomination of chuck hagel to be the next defense secretary. ann joins us from tennessee, a democrat. caller: it does not matter who president obama nominates. the republicans will get everything and everybody he puts up there. they do not know -- what anybody who knows about war or how it feels to be in war. they can sit behind that desk and put authorizations. someone who has walked in their shoes know about war. it is time for the republicans and democrats to wake up. host: thanks for calling. gary schmitt? guest: there are senators who have walked in those shoes. senator mccain has locked in those shoes and sacrificed a great deal -- has walked in those shoes and sacrificed a great deal. i do not think that is the issue. it is not clear senator hagel, he may not get many votes from republican senators for the nomination, but there are a number of senators who lean toward more libertarian positions on foreign policy and would probably be more supportive o
is as bad as it is? guest: the cdc, which is based in atlanta, is the main agency of the federal government and in the world who does disease striking, so they have capabilities of determining the relative percentage of visits in different types of clinics throughout the country that are related to what we call influenza-like illnesses. then they do testing among them to determine if it actually is influenza or if it is another type of respiratory infection. what they have shown from the beginning of all this, like i said, which started at the end of november and beginning of december, is that we are having an upsurge in the number of percentages of visits that are related to influenza-like illness. they have successfully identified what kind of influence it is and they know exactly what the strain is. that is important, because one of the things in this mass of sobering news is good news that the influenza strains that are circulating throughout society in the united states are very well matched to the vaccine that has been distributed. that is a very powerful argument for getting vaccinat
. conservative republican governor, are former house colleague, and the liberal mayor of atlanta, are clearly at opposite ends of the political spectrum. yet they have managed to bridge the divide with a commitment to results. mr. speaker, together they have achieved significant gains for the good of georgia. mr. speaker, congress and the white house are perfectly capable of following that same model for the good of our country. americans may be politically divided, but they are united in their desire to see their leaders in washington achieve results. mr. speaker, we know it is far from perfect, but i hope this bipartisan agreement can lay the foundation for continued work to address the tremendous challenges that we face as a nation. millions of americans are out of work. the national debt as a percentage of gross domestic product is too high. upheaval exists in nearly every region across the globe. education and immigration reform must happen. the potential for a crippling cyber attack continues to be a threat. climate change is a fact of life and, most recently, our families are reeling f
" -- from "the arizona republic" -- this is from "the atlanta journal constitution" -- why january 20 and white a second ceremony on january 21? there's an answer available on the website committee. this is the seventh time in our nation's history that the mandated date for an inauguration has fallen on a sunday. the first time was back in 1821. that was president monroe's second swearing in and it happened with zachary taylor and more recently, president eisenhower and president reagan in their second term had inauguration's fallen on a sunday and the constitution was changed back in the 1930's. fdr was sworn in on march 4 and congress and the president deems the transition peiord was far too long so it was moved to january 20. we will have live coverage of the swearing in today from the white house and just past 8:00 this morning, vice president joe biden will be sworn in from the naval observatory, the official residence of the vice president. the inaugural committee released a web video as the president reflected on what is next for him and his administration. [video clip] >> i st
dress. >> atlanta, georgia is next. and he and the democrats line. >> i thought it was very beautiful. her dress was beautiful. i think they are to youthful people. i. i am glad he was reelected. >> the president today signing the nominations of john kerry and jacob lew -- jack lew. john kerry will have his hearing later this week to be secretary of state. the current secretary of state, hillary clinton, testifying twice this week on the ben ghazi attack. let's go to gardiner, maine on our republican line. >> this is roberta. onto to say i thought obama's acceptance speech was absolutely brilliant. i think that susan collins -- i am very disappointed in my senator. >> when you say susan collins needs hearing aids, what did you hear from her after the speech question mark next >> she did not feel that he reached across the aisle. she did not hear the same speech i heard. >> what was the dominant thing that you heard -- the theme that you heard from the president's speech? >> the men could not possibly have done more -- then more open or more accepting or more generous or more openheart
. senator saxby chambliss. you can read more about that in the atlanta constitution and many others. stanley from massachusetts is on the line for independents. your thoughts regarding term limits. caller: thank you for having me on. what about pensions? they should not get a pension if they have term limits. for life? come on. host: that sounds like an interesting thought. we will move to betty on the line for democrats. caller: thank you very much. i oppose term limits. in a sense, every elected official has term limits because they can be voted out. in ore., a long-term service gives us a board appropriate chance to argue against the states that have high population when we have low population. two examples are senator wayne morris and mark hatfield. when morris was the first senator to speak out against the vietnam war because it was against international law. senator hatfield likewise served to his retirement. both men with great honor. when morris was elected as a republican from eastern oregon. he walked the aisle and became a democrat and was reelected as a democrat. i think the curr
. maria from arizona. qassim from atlanta, georgia. rick from phoenix, arizona. and ashley from fresno, calif. [applause] than all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country. we are so grateful. outstanding business leaders are here as well. of course, we have wonderful students here. [applause] those of you have a seat, feel free to take a seat. i do not mind. i love you back. [applause] last week, i had the honor of being sworn in for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] and during my inaugural address, i talked about how making progress on the finding challenges of our time does not require us to settle every debate or ignore every different we may have, but it does require us to find common ground and move forward in common purpose. it requires us to act. i know that some issues will be harder to lift than others. some debates will be more contentious. that is to be expected. but the reason i came here today is because of the challenge where the differences are dwindling, where a broad consensus is emerging, and where a call for
, is not to deny the moment an atlanta and the ability to have more than 10 rounds, but to have somebody like you, chief johnson, meet them when they come to the door. that is the best way to do it. my good friend joe biden, who i have spirited conversations about a lot of things, was talking to somebody in california who mentioned the fact, what if there is an earthquake out here and there is a lawless situation? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there w
yesterday, you can certainly watch atlanta cspan.org. good morning, what kind of work do you do? caller: i'm in the mental health field. each level of the patients have had different mental health issues. and i have really been waiting for this issue to come up, because that's what concerns me the most. i have worked with people that have multiple personalities. we have been scared to death. they pick beds up. they have tremendous anger in there. i don't think they get the proper care that they need. and after a while, they're released and that is something that i'm really concerned with. it's not about who is able to get a gun, who is able to have a gun. that's not the issue right here. the issue is that we have to start dealing with people with mental health issues. i have worked in a vietnam hospital. i have worked with people with ptsd. one guy on the floor, he wabdel weighed 120 pounds soaking wet and had 10 personalities. and no one could stop him. and i cannot imagine that guy being out on the streets and able to carry a gun. and if -- host: do you know if he was a gun owner? caller
. it is far worse atlanta the bill that he tried to, sort of, tried to pass a week or so ago. it is far worse for republicans but i think it is interesting in one respect it is an element of leadership. he is saying you guys vote for this or whatever, he could say hold the bill up and -- he could stop it. i don't think he is going to do that. part of the reason i don't think he's going to do it because 90% or 89 votes in support of it. that would suggest this way this town is constructed right now that is overwhelming support. he would not look that good if he would single-handedly stop something like that. in that respect i do think conservatives can shea this is leadership on his part. he will get some kind of speakership re-election with the caucus. on the other hand, he has been even handed about this stuff and i don't think -- there are a lot of complaints among the conservative members of the house, you can't say he's been -- he really hasn't been -- he has not given them a lot of trouble. he tries to give them what they want. i think a lot of conservatives may view him as the best poss
, the nation, not atlanta, >> that would be taking cyberwar to a new -- >> as the russians tanks crossed the border into georgia, simultaneously cyberattack hit georgia. and knocked out its telecommunications, its banking, connectivity to the outside word. you're right, cyberwar will probably always be part of a larger war. and cyberwar i think will only happen when a nation going to go to war anyway. no nation going to say, i have a new chinese cyberweapon. let's go out and go to war see if it works. we have had nuclear weapons since 1945, nine nations have them. no one has used one since 1945. so if the united states and iran get into a shooting war next year, which is highly possible, they'll probably -- there will probable be a cyberdimension to it. >> i won't talk about the united states' role and who is doing or might do cyberwar to whom. the united states is obviously not an innocent bystander in all this. you mentioned it's practiced if one supposes a degree, has a degree of cyberwar capability. who else, who are the superpowers of cyberwar? >> well, the c.i.a. says there are bet
it up in four years? host: all right, debra, a democrat. thad is a republican in atlanta, georgia. what are your thoughts? caller: i called because i'd like to know why the inch r.s. has delayed accepting tax returns when the fiscal cliff had nothing to do with the 2012 tax cuts. host: did you watch the inaugural address? caller: i did. host: thoughts on that? caller: i don't really have any thoughts on that host: why not? ok. we go on to jeff in new orleans, independent caller. caller: i seen the inauguration and watched the speech. it's the same old, same old to me. same rhetoric, same speech. i'm not here to diminish anybody's happiness or how they feel about the royce torical aspects of it but it seems like the same thing i'm ready to see what's going to be pen to paper, the bills that will be passed a and what has been passed that's not being talked about. i think americans need to wake up and get away from the pageantry and rhetoric of it all and pay attention to what's happening. host: republican response after the address, here's a quote from daryl issa, the top republican on t
. what's your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? john in atlanta, georgia, democrat. caller: how are you? my advice is in the form of this. that the congress in both houses, the senate and the house, work and serve at the pleasure of the american people. my advice is do what is best for the american people. pay your? -- pay your debts. pay what you are supposed to pay and stop holding up the debt ceiling and holding it over. you think you are holding it head, but they are holding it over the american people's head. my advice is let's get the show on the road this year. no extensions. let's make a clean breast of it. host: there's a story in the baltimore sun this morning on raising the debt limit. here is an image of a democrat of vermont saying the debt ceiling is being used as an economic weapon of mass destruction. what is your advice to republicans? our next caller is rorie in erie, pennsylvania, republican. caller: my advice is to stop using our entitlement for immigration purposes. that seems to be ignored repeatedly, that we keep giving our entitleme
arizona. qassim from atlanta, georgia. rick from phoenix, arizona. and ashley from fresno, calif. [applause] than all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country. we are so grateful. outstanding business leaders are here as well. of course, we have wonderful students here. [applause] those of you have a seat, feel free to take a seat. i do not mind. . love you back [applause] last week, i had the honor of being sworn in for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] and during my inaugural address, i talked about how making progress on the finding challenges of our time does not require us to settle every debate or ignore every different we may have, but it does require us to find common ground and move forward in common purpose. it requires us to act. i know that some issues will be harder to lift than others. some debates will be more contentious. that is to be expected. but the reason i came here today is because of the challenge where the differences are dwindling. we're a broad consensus is emerging. and where a call for action c
for into in atlanta uses the truth-o-meter on state and local officials. i am glad to hear you are reading our work and their work and i am happy our word is getting out host:politifact looked at issues -- looks at issues like energy. what to do find overall? guest: a lot of that area was included in the economic stimulus bill. it was a big grab bag, $787 billion of goodies that included many things for energy and the environment. i don't recall offhand the overall ratings for energy but i know a lot were included in the economic stimulus bill. host: is president obama making fewer promises that he was initially? guest: absolutely, the 2012 campaign was a campaign of attacks. when we look back at the moments of the campaign, as you look at the debates, what they were sitting on the campaign trail, what they were saying in commercials -- they spent some months of the time attacking each other and relatively little really laying out their agenda in any detail. particularly, mitt romney did not provide any details about his tax plan but even obama spent some much time attacking the romney that there w
forces have taken another historic step to toward harning the atlantas and skills of all our military personnel ." throughing or rethroughing a ban on military-style sexual weapons and high-capacity magazines. joining some members of congress, law enforcement officials and members of gun safety organizations. this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i want to welcome you. this is a tough battle, so welcome. i'm pleased to be joined this morning by a cross section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today, police chiefs, mayors, teachers, doctors, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and many others who care deeply about this issue. i would really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us have been working to prevent gun violence for decades. together we're introducing legislation to help in the mass shootings that have devastated countless familyings and terrorized communities. you will hear
-- no republicans. i grew up in atlanta. republicans were as scarce as polar bears. everybody else was a democrat. the democrats had ended reconstruction and were the party of solidarity. since then, this movement transformed politics, transformed our world in ways that we suppressed because we have a terrible history of making any crossed racial memory comfortable to ourselves. we did it in the civil war for 100 years. we have done it for 50 years now in relation to the civil-rights movement. the liberations set free in the past 50 years -- the word "gay" was not invented 50 years ago. it referred to a crime that dare not speak its name. what dares not speak its name is the name liberal. a triumph for conservative politics and resentment against the government that made all these things possible. this little moment between kennedy and martin luther king about the emancipation proclamation should be a wake-up call to remember that we do not remember things across racial lines and that we prove ourselves that race is profoundly uncomfortable for most of the dominant culture to the point that milli
morning john. >> i'm certified by georgia clean air as an emission inspector in atlanta, yorg george. and we have a coalition of air inspectors and we're all armed with five gas annual liesers, we do all the test and fut stickers on the cars, we do tall testing. and we have the infrared machines with zero air gas calibration. we put the stickers on the cars. and we have contacted ms. jackson with e.p.a. because the findings they are finding on co 2 are not correct. we do not have a co 2 problem. it weighs 1.5 times as much as air. you don't find it up in the atmosphere. it's harmless. it repells oxygen. you can heat it up and it won't climb into the atmosphere. it wation more than air. we've contacted ms. jackson and others and they try to get us to change what we're saying and doing. they even try to dispute our machines, then they realize if they've got to dispute our machines they have to give everybody back money for the inspection. we've talked to al gore. those scientistist will confront us. they are trying to tell us fact that is don't exist. >> talk to us about why the presid
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)